Pineapple Frozen Yogurt

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This recipe came about in kind of a strange way…I bought a carton of yogurt I really didn’t like. I was at a store I don’t often go to and couldn’t find my usual brand. And every other brand I recognized was all skim milk. So I grabbed one that was supposedly Greek yogurt but turned out to be kind of slimy and icky but I couldn’t stand to just throw a whole container away. I had some pineapple and was suddenly inspired!
I added a little of this and a little of that and all of three of us loved it. Even my hubby, who isn’t crazy about frozen yogurt, especially the fruity kinds. (He prefers the chocolate variety. Or peanut butter. Or chocolate and peanut butter…you get the idea.)

A few notes about the ingredients:

Yogurt: So, what about the skim milk? Part of it for me is I eat almost no dairy. The almost? Is yogurt. That, and the occasional real cheese on pizza every once in a while. I also use ghee in place of butter (butter that has been clarified and the lactose and casein are removed; it’s easier to digest and rich in vitamins – yes, it’s from real butter and it’s good for you!). And I hate to admit I’ve become a bit of a yogurt snob. I’ve become very picky about it, but part of that is as I mentioned, it’s usually the only dairy I have. I just have not been able to make or find a store-bought dairy-free version I like, so if I’m going to cheat on the dairy, then why not enjoy it?! The other thing is a personal choice. The other part of the picky is the type of dairy.

I largely stay away from dairy because I don’t handle it well, but have discovered I do fine with small amounts of good-quality, full fat dairy. Skim milk is very processed; all the fats – and the vitamins it naturally contains – are taken out then synthetic vitamins are added back in. That doesn’t make much sense to me. And recent studies actually claim that full fat dairy is actually better for you. I bought into the low/no-fat fad years ago…and ended up the unhealthiest I have ever been. When I simply started focusing on real, wholesome food I lost weight I had been struggling with for years (without really trying which I didn’t think was humanly possible) and several health issues drastically improved or disappeared completely. It’s a matter of personal choice, but an interesting one I did not come about lightly.
And fermented dairy, aka yogurt, is easier on the tummy. Does it ever bother me? Sometimes. I actually consider it a treat. It’s one of the few things I’ve been able to reintroduce to an already quite restricted diet and I enjoy it. Like I said, personal choice. Here’s some food for thought. In her book, Nourishing Traditions, the author Sally Fallon says “the fermentation of milk results in numerous beneficial changes. Fermentation breaks down casein, or milk protein, one of the most difficult proteins to digest. Culturing restores many of the enzymes destroyed during pasteurization including lactase, which helps digest lactose or milk sugar. Lactase produced during the culturing process allows many people who are sensitive to fresh milk to tolerate fermented milk products. Both vitamin B and vitamin C content of milk increase during fermentation.”

Collagen Peptide: Collagen is an insoluble protein made up of amino acids. You can find it naturally in things like a well-made broth and in cuts of meat that contain skin and bone. It contains high amounts of proteins and also vitamins. It’s good for your gut as well as your hair, skin, and nails. I get it in powder form and add it to just about anything. I try to add it to at least something every day (there’s no taste and you won’t even tell it’s in there). I add it to my coffee, yogurt, smoothies, hot cereals, and even some baked goods! There are lots of good articles out there about its benefits if you’re curious. I started using it years ago and haven’t looked back.

Pineapple: These are one of my favorite fruits! Super sweet but also so good for you. Fresh is best, and it’s on the Clean Fifteen list, which means It’s low on the pesticide scale and safe to buy conventional over organic (hence, it’s more budget-friendly!). Pineapple is very hydrating and anti-inflammatory, it boosts energy, is a natural decongestant, and is rich in vitamins like vitamin C, B6, folate, and thiamin. It contains minerals like manganese, copper, magnesium, and potassium. It’s also a good source of fiber and healthy carbohydrates. (Yes, there is such a thing as a healthy carb; they fuel your body, regulate your blood sugar, and make you feel fuller – as opposed to the opposite that an unhealthy carb does.)

Ginger and Turmeric: These are anti-inflammatory spices that taste good and are good for you! Ginger is great for the immune system and can relieve an upset tummy. It’s also a natural anti-viral. Both are natural detoxifiers for the body. Turmeric is also good for the digestive tract. It’s also very good for the liver and it has been used in Chinese medicine as a natural anti-depressant. The health benefits are good, but I used them because I like them and think they are a great accompaniment to the pineapple.
Himalayan Pink Salt: Himalayan Pink Salt contains 80-plus minerals and elements without the negative effects your run of the mill table salt contains, where all the minerals except for sodium and chloride are stripped away. It also helps balance the pH in your body, which is very important. Here, I added it for its health benefits, but also because a small amount of salt helps balance the sweet.

Raw Honey: The difference between raw and conventional honey is raw honey has not been heated, which can destroy the vitamins, nutrients, and enzymes it contains. Local honey, which I used, is also a great choice if you suffer from allergies or environmentally-induced asthma. It will contain local pollen, which can help in the anti-histamine reaction the allergies induce. It has anti-viral and anti-fungal properties and can help stabilize blood sugar, instead of throwing it out of whack like refined sugar does. Also, check your labels. You might be surprised to find how much of that regular “honey” is actually high fructose corn syrup. I’ve even seen some that advertise, “made with real honey,” and maybe it was, but the first ingredient is the aforementioned highly processed corn syrup and honey is very low on a very long list. When buying honey, whether raw or not, there should only be ONE ingredient: HONEY. I initially wasn’t going to add any but then added only about a teaspoon full after adding the ginger and turmeric; the sweet helps balance the spice, I think.

I hope you found this information helpful. I personally find it really interesting when someone breaks down ingredients I may or not be familiar with. It’s good to always be learning! Now onto the recipe! Note, some of the amounts are approximate because I really did just add everything to taste and according to what I had in my fridge/pantry. Please feel free to adjust to your personal tastes. Enjoy!

Pineapple Frozen Yogurt
1-1/2 cups pineapple, cubed
16 ounces plain yogurt of choice
½ teaspoon powdered ginger
¼ teaspoon powdered turmeric
1 scoop (or about 2 heaping tablespoons) collagen peptide
A pinch of Himalayan Pink Salt
Raw Honey to taste

~ Add all ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth. Add to an ice cream maker and churn until thickened. Mine took about twenty minutes – just long enough for me to do the other dishes before we enjoyed this for dessert!

In Good (and pineapple-flavored) health,
Emily

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Sources:
Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. Nourishing Traditions. Washington, DC., 1999
http://time.com/4279538/low-fat-milk-vs-whole-milk/
http://holisticsquid.com/milk-hero-or-villian/
https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/pineapples.html
https://wellnessmama.com/3058/collagen-hydrolysate/
http://fitlife.tv/10-health-benefits-of-turmeric/
https://ritely.com/benefits-of-ginger/
http://www.lifejacks.com/health-benefits-himalayan-pink-salt/
https://bodyunburdened.com/health-benefits-raw-honey/

Pumpkin Spice Latte (Dairy-Free, AIP-Variaton, Refined Sugar-Free)

November 23, 2014 - Pumpkin Spice Latte (Dairy-Free, AIP Variation, Refined Sugar-Free

I have seen no shortage of pumpkin spice latte recipes the last couple of months, but I have yet to see an AIP-complaint one. What is AIP? If you are new to my page, AIP stands for Autoimmune Protocol. It’s a version of the paleo diet that eliminates several items that are damaging to the gut in certain people. I went completely grain free earlier this year, did the super strict elimination diet and have since added various items back in and discovered what I can and cannot have. I have successfully added back into my diet small amounts of nuts, seeds, and eggs, and even a little dairy here or there, but all of those I have to be very careful of. Too much and I am left with an upset tummy and terrible eczema flares.

So, I follow what you could call a modified AIP. One of the things I absolutely cannot tolerate are nightshades. What is a nightshade? It is a term for certain fruits, vegetables and seeds with a certain make up that can cause harmful gut irritation in some individuals, particularly those with autoimmune issues. Some common nightshades include bell peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, and spices like cumin, cayenne, fennel, fenugreek, and spices in a pumpkin spice latte like nutmeg. For me exposure to nightshades – even just a little – makes the eczema flare like crazy and my skin feel like it’s on fire. Not fun.

So, back to the latte. There’s the fact it’s seasoned with nightshade spices, but I only learned about nightshades a couple of months ago. It’s been a few years since I ordered a pumpkin spice latte from that you-know-who coffee chain giant. Why? It was fall and I used to wait all year long for the pumpkin spice latte, but I heard it had gluten in it. I asked in the store and was met with a blank stare. That’s happened more than once and I sure wish they would train their baristas better; they’d get a whole lot more of my business if they did. I did a little research of my own and was shocked.

Number one, there is no pumpkin in it. Not any real pumpkin anyway. That is ARTIFICIAL flavor. And that bright orange color? Well, if the flavor isn’t real where do you think the color comes from? Yeah, it’s not real either. Many of the chains use milk from GMO-grain fed cows. They contain copious amounts of refined sugar, not to mention preservatives. Some of these ingredients are actually banned in other countries! Appetizing, isn’t it? Sorry if I just ruined them for you; I was bummed too but I’m glad I found out. I don’t want any of that junk in my body.

I am not shouting from the rooftops for you to never order one of these again or judging you if you do, but knowledge is power. Now you know and can decide for yourself. I will have a dairy- or refined sugar-containing treat every once in a while but this no-no list is personally a little long for me. And it is SO EASY to make your own – and I can make it dairy- and nightshade-free! Yay, bring on fall and the pumpkin spice lattes again!

One more note about the AIP variation. Try it with dandelion tea. If you are full AIP and cannot tolerate coffee try Roasted Dandelion Root tea. It is so good and has a rich and deep, almost coffee-like flavor. Once you add all the other latte ingredients it’s hard to tell the difference. I personally do not notice much of a difference in my body whether I drink coffee or not so I have left it in my diet. I simply enjoy it and I have had to eliminate so much from my diet I have simply cut back and I limit myself. It’s a treat, and this latte is quite a treat. Believe me. On to the good stuff!

Pumpkin Spice Latte (Dairy Free with AIP Option, Refined Sugar Free)
Serves 1
1 cup milk (for AIP use coconut milk but any dairy-free milk will do – or even cow’s milk if you tolerate dairy! – almond milk is good too if you can handle nuts, lending a bit of a nutty flavor)
1-1/2 Tablespoons pumpkin purée, fresh or canned
½ Tablespoon maple syrup (I like the hint of maple from the syrup but honey works and coconut sugar is also good)
¼ teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of ground cloves
1-2 shots of espresso OR ½-1 cup strongly-brewed coffee or Dandelion Root tea

1. In a small saucepan combine the milk with your sweetener of choice and the pumpkin and warm over medium heat. Stir in spices.
2. Add the hot espresso, coffee, or tea to your cup (I say 1-2 shots or ½-1 cup because I like to taste the coffee in a latte so I add extra).
3. Optional, steam the milk mixture. If you have an espresso machine use the milk steamer; if not, simply whisk the hot milk mixture to froth it; an immersion blender with the whisk attachment works great or you can put the milk in a jar and vigorously shake it (just use an oven mitt or wrap it in a towel first!) This is just optional but it only takes a second and gives you that nice coffee house froth on top. It’s just fun.
4. If desired, sprinkle a little extra cinnamon on top and then enjoy! Beat that you-know-who giant coffee chain!

This is also good iced. The first couple of times I made it was when it was too hot for a hot latte in the afternoon (I like my coffee black and not sweet at all in the morning). Fall comes late to Southern California, where I am. Simply whisk the milk and spices together and add to chilled coffee or espresso. You can blend it also. It’s super yummy! Enjoy!

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Cheers!

Emily